Visit the Course Catalog for the official course description and listing

Psychology Course Offerings:

PSYC 110: Introduction to Psychological Science

Staff
Psychology is the scientific study of behavior and of underlying mental and physiological processes. Students are introduced to the goals of psychological science, the nature of scientific thinking, and the scientific methods psychologists use to study, explain, and predict animal and human behavior. A variety of content areas are discussed. Students apply their knowledge in weekly laboratory activities with animals and human participants using various scientific methods. Offered every semester. Lecture/laboratory. [NS]

PSYC 120: Quantitative Methods in Psychology

Staff
An introduction to basic research design, measurement, and the use of descriptive and inferential statistics in psychological research. Topics include correlation, regression, reliability, validity, hypothesis testing, nonparametric techniques, and inferential statistics such as t-tests and analysis of variance. The Statistical Package for the Social Sciences (SPSS) is presented and utilized in a computer component of the course. Offered every semester.
Prerequisite: PSYC 110

PSYC 203: Design and Analysis I

Staff
This course introduces students to research methods used to conduct empirical studies in psychology. Students learn how psychological research is designed and conducted, data are analyzed, and findings are reported. Students read professional journal articles of psychological research, developing skills necessary to draw critical conclusions and design research studies. Lecture/Laboratory. [Q]
Prerequisite: PSYC 110 and PSYC 120

PSYC 219: Cross-Cultural Psychology

Basow
This course introduces students to the field of psychology that examines the influence of culture upon human behavior and cognitive processes. We will focus on such topics as cultural factors in communication (verbal, nonverbal), personality and identity, gender roles, health (mental and physical), parenting, and social values. Our exploration will be based on psychological theories, research, guest lecturers, and field experiences.
Prerequisite: PSYC 110 or permission of instructor

PSYC 225: Psychopharmacology

Gabel, Schettino
This course examines the neurological, physiological, and psychological effects of psychoactive drugs such as sedatives, stimulants, opiates, antidepressants, alcohol, and hallucinogens. The use of psychoactive drugs in treating mental disorders such as schizophrenia and manic-depressive illness is also explored.
Prerequisite: PSYC 110

PSYC 226: Human Factors and Engineering Psychology

Nees
Human Factors and Engineering Psychology provides an overview of the role of psychology in the design and evaluation of the systems with which humans interact. The course examines how knowledge of the psychological capabilities, limitations, and preferences of humans can be used in design and practical applications to increase the efficiency, usability, and desirability of systems and decrease human errors, accidents, and annoyance. Prerequisite: PSYC 110

PSYC 230: Lifespan Development

Bookwala, Myers
This is a survey course of the area of Lifespan Development. We will explore the fundamental theories, principles and current research in the field, covering prenatal and child development through older adulthood. The topics we will cover include developmental changes in an individual’s biological, physical, cognitive, social, and emotional life over the entire lifespan. We will also explore genetic, contextual, and environmental influences on development.
Prerequisite: PSYC 110 or permission of instructor

PSYC 231: Personality

Basow
An examination of the major theories of personality including an evaluation of their strengths and weaknesses. Theories are applied to specific people in order to facilitate understanding how and why people behave. Current issues in personality research are also highlighted.
Prerequisite: PSYC 110 or permission of instructor

PSYC 232: Abnormal Psychology

Basow, Wenze
This course examines current practices in diagnosing and treating mental illnesses and explores theories about the causes of these disorders. Major psychological disorders such as depression, substance abuse, and schizophrenia are evaluated in light of the latest research findings.
Prerequisite: PSYC 110 or permission of instructor

PSYC 235: Social Behavior

Childs, Shaw
The psychological bases of social phenomena in individuals and groups are explored. Topics include theory and methods, social perception, attitudes, prejudice and discrimination, leadership, aggression, small groups, attraction, and love.
Prerequisite: PSYC 110 or permission of instructor

PSYC 236: Applied Behavior Analysis

Allan
An examination of the application of the principles of learning to the control of human behavior. Principles of operant and Pavlovian conditioning including, but not limited to, the concepts of reinforcement, punishment, stimulus control, and schedules of reinforcement are discussed. Students explore how these techniques may be applied in personal, therapeutic, institutional, corporate, and social settings.
Prerequisite: PSYC 110 or permission of instructor

PSYC 240: Health Psychology

Bookwala, Childs
The role of psychology in all aspects of health care is examined. Students study and discuss such issues as: the use of psychological methods in preventive medicine and treatment; research methods for examining and improving interpersonal relationships within the health care setting; and the role of psychology in health care delivery.
Prerequisite: PSYC 110 or permission of instructor

PSYC 242: Educational Psychology

Myers
This course introduces students to the theory and research underlying instructional practice. Topics include cognitive and behavioral approaches to learning, components of effective teaching, classroom motivation, measurement and testing issues, and consideration of individual differences.
Prerequisite: PSYC 110 or permission of instructor

PSYC 248: Psychology of Gender

Basow
An examination of gender from a psychological perspective including research on gender similarities and differences and gender socialization. Emphasis is placed on the consequences of gender stereotypes and roles for the individual, relationships, and society as a whole. Change strategies and goals are also discussed. [GM1]
Prerequisite: PSYC 110 or permission of instructor

PSYC 256: Cognitive Psychology I

Talarico
Cognitive psychology is the study of how humans process (i.e., acquire, store, and use) information. Topics include perception, attention, memory, imagery, problem solving, expertise and other processes that allow us to function in the world. This course will provide you with a survey of the phenomena and theories of human cognition through an exploration of past and present research within the field. We will examine these issues through a combination of lectures, demonstrations, and discussion.
Prerequisite: PSYC 110 or permission of instructor

PSYC 304: Design and Analysis II

Vinchur
This course focuses on theory and application in the areas of measurement, research design, and statistical analysis and interpretation. Topics include coverage of selected multivariate techniques (e.g., multiple regression, discriminant analysis, factor analysis), measurement theory, and meta- analytic techniques. Emphasis is on developing the necessary skills for success as an independent researcher. Lecture/laboratory. [NS, W]
Prerequisite: PSYC 203 or permission of instructor

PSYC 321: Learning

Allan
Principles derived from learning experiments represent one of the most powerful tools for understanding behavior. This course examines Pavlovian and operant relations involved in behavior change (in an evolutionary context) and how these factors continue to be discovered in animal and human experimental work. Lectures set the stage for a series of experiments conducted during laboratory sessions, and class discussions of additional readings and experimental work will cover research design issues, data analytic techniques, and written presentation of experimental findings. Behavioral interpretations of linguistic and cognitive approaches will also be discussed. Lecture/laboratory. [NS, W]
Prerequisite: PSYC 120

PSYC 322: Perception

Nees
Perception comprises psychological and physiological processes underlying our ability to get and use information about our environment. This course examines perceptual processing that transforms sensation to cognition. We focus primarily on visual perception of color, depth, and motion with attention also to audition, touch, and pain. Lecture and laboratory complement each other in the exploration of phenomena and measurement methodologies. In laboratory work, students design and run experiments, analyze data, and present findings of perception-based studies. Lecture/laboratory. [NS, W]
Prerequisite: PSYC 203 or permission of instructor

PSYC 323: Physiological Psychology

Gabel, Schettino
The neural, hormonal, and physiological bases of animal and human behavior are examined. Physiological aspects of such topics as language, learning and memory, feeding, sexual behavior, emotions, sleep, and neurological disorders are covered. In the laboratory, students will conduct discovery-oriented research utilizing a variety of techniques employed by physiological psychologists and neuroscientists. Lecture/laboratory. [NS, W]
Prerequisite: PSYC 110, 120 or NEUR 201

PSYC 324: Comparative Psychology: Animal Behavior

Buckley
This course examines how evolution has shaped the behaviors of animals to be adaptive, primarily exploring the functional significance of animal behavior. Topics include animal communication, foraging, antipredator strategies, sociality, mating systems, and parental care patterns. Laboratory involves naturalistic observations and experimental research with a variety of animal species. Lecture/laboratory. [NS, W]
Prerequisite: PSYC 120

PSYC 327: Advanced Social Psychology

Shaw, Childs
Examines how social psychologists conduct research. Students read and critique primary sources on such topics as altruism and compliance. In the laboratory component, students conduct research projects illustrating various social psychological methods. Lecture/ laboratory. [NS, W]
Prerequisite: PSYC 203 and 235 or permission of instructor

PSYC 328: Advanced Developmental Psychology

Bookwala, Myers
Advanced course that focuses on either development during childhood, youth and/or adulthood. This is a laboratory course that focuses on current theoretical models, recent research, and assessment and analytic methods in relation to a range of course-relevant topics. Students conduct research projects related to the topics under study in laboratory or field settings. [NS, W]
Prerequisite: PSYC 203 and 233 or 234 or permission of instructor

PSYC 330: Cognitive Psychology II

Talarico                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                        This course will cover advanced issues in a sub discipline of cognition. We will be covering theoretical, empirical, and practical aspects of the subject. You will learn how researchers ask and experimentally answer questions using behavioral, neuropsychological, and neuroimaging approaches. The course will cover both the “classics” of cognitive research as well as modern developments in the field. We will examine these issues through a combination of lectures, demonstrations, experiments, and discussion. [NS, W]                                                          Prerequisite: PSYC 203 and PSYC 256

PSYC 334: Mood Disorders

Wenze
This course will take a biopsychosocial approach to the symptomatology, etiology, and treatment of mood disorders. Seminal studies on depression and bipolar disorder will be presented, along with current studies highlighting novel, cutting-edge research and treatment paradigms. Key topics such as comorbidity, diversity and cultural considerations, and suicide will be explored in depth. Equal attention will be devoted to current controversies in the field.
Prerequisite: PSYC 110 and PSYC 232 or permission of instructor

 PSYC 335: Industrial Psychology

Vinchur
An overview of industrial (personnel) psychology. Topics include criterion development, performance appraisal, recruitment and selection, validation research, selection bias, job analysis, training and development, compensation, and personnel psychology and the law.
Prerequisite: PSYC 120, MATH 176 or 186 or permission of instructor

PSYC 336: Organizational Behavior

Vinchur
An overview of organizational psychology. Topics include motivation, leadership, group processes, organizational stress, job satisfaction, communication processes, decision theory, power, and organizational effectiveness, development, and theory.
Prerequisite: PSYC 120, MATH 176 or 186 or permission of instructor

PSYC 337: Counseling Psychology

Basow
Examines some of the major theories of counseling such as psychodynamic therapy, cognitive behavior therapy, and client-centered therapy. Students are involved with both conceptual and practical aspects of each counseling approach.
Prerequisite: PSYC 231 or permission of instructor

PSYC 339: Tests and Measurement

Vinchur
The emphasis in this course is on the principles underlying psychological testing. These princples are applied to tests in all content areas in psychology (e.g., clinical, educational, neurological, and industrial). Topics include the history of psychological tests, technical and methodological concerns such as reliability and validity, and legal, social, and ethical issues. Prominent tests in selected content areas of psychology are examined.
Prerequisite: PSYC 120 or permission of instructor

PSYC 340: History and Systems of Psychology

Childs, Vinchur
Provides a historical survey of psychology with an emphasis on the development of scientific psychology in the late 19th and early 20th centuries. Among the topics explored are the origins of psychology in philosophy and neurology, “schools” of psychology such as functionalism, Gestalt psychology, and behaviorism, and the lives and careers of psychology pioneers. [W]
Prerequisite: PSYC 110, junior or senior standing, or permission of instructor

PSYC 342, 343: Advanced Applied Psychology

Staff
An experientially based course in which students apply their knowledge from academic course work to a field setting and explore research relevant to their field activities. The internship site matches the student’s interest (e.g., human service agency; personnel department, etc.). Field supervision/seminar. [W]
Prerequisite: Psychology major or minor, junior or senior status, and permission of instructor

PSYC 351-360: Special Topics

Staff
A seminar devoted to a subject of interest to students and faculty. Announcement of the proposed subject is made before the registration period each semester. Open to psychology majors or by permission of instructor.

PSYC 391, 392: Independent Study

Staff
An opportunity for students to pursue a topic of choice with the guidance of a faculty member. Each student examines the topic using primary and secondary sources, and writes a paper of distinguished quality. The study may be designed for one or two semesters. [W]
Prerequisite: PSYC 203 and permission of department head

PSYC 491, 492: Advanced Research

Staff
An opportunity for students to engage in an empirical study using advanced research techniques with the guidance of a faculty member. Students undertake a research project in an area of choice designed for one or two semesters. The work should culminate in a data-based paper of distinguished quality. [W]
Prerequisite: PSYC 203 and permission of department head

PSYC 495, 496: Thesis

Staff
Open to qualified majors by permission of department head. [W]